Recent Interviews


The Numinous Podcast
On Love and Grief in the Age of Collapse

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KBOO's Religion for Life
Love in the Age of Ecological Apocalypse

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Conversations with Andrew Harvey

Carolyn and Andrew Harvey on How To Respond To Catastrophic Climate Change.

Carolyn and Andrew discuss collapse.

Living Resiliently

Carolyn’s Latest Books

John Michael Greer: The God Of Technological Progress May Well Be Dead

The Reverence Of Approach, By Francis Weller

Reverence

An approach of reverence establishes a foundation ripe for amazement. We are readied for surprise and awe by a posture of reverence. It is a stance of humility, recognizing that the otherness that surround us—that infuses the world—is vast and powerful and yet curiously open for connection. An approach of reverence invites the mystery of encounter where two solitudes meet and become entangled, creating a Third Body, an intimacy born of affection. All true intimacy requires an approach of reverence, a deep regard, an unknowing of who or what we are meeting. It is our bow honoring the exchange.

. . . → Read More: The Reverence Of Approach, By Francis Weller

Foreword To “Love In The Age of Ecological Apocalypse,” By Craig Chalquist, Ph.D.

Craig Chalquist

Beyond offering blueprints and practical examples for crafting and strengthening relationships, every page carries the author’s belief in what Abraham Lincoln referred to as “the better angels of our nature.” Perhaps we would not be in such a dismal state of planetary destabilization if we had figured out how to stop influential cynics from infecting collective consciousness with their pathological lack of faith in human nature. For centuries views of people as inherently greedy, stupid, passive, or warlike have proved most convenient to bullies and racketeers who pass themselves off as world leaders. A more realistic appraisal of human possibilities calls for new kinds of mentoring and leadership charged with creating community at the edge, wherever possible.

. . . → Read More: Foreword To “Love In The Age of Ecological Apocalypse,” By Craig Chalquist, Ph.D.

Join Me June 12-14, 2015: The Gifts Of Grief: Grief As Sacred Work

Time For Tribe: Boomers Get Connected, By Bill Kauth & Zoe Alowan

Communities Magazine

Learning how to engage people in our “New Tribe” model took us seven years of devotion and focus. There were some dramatic fails, like repeatedly calling a group of people together saying “Lets build community!” They were always wildly enthusiastic, but for some reason that was the last time that group ever met. After too often “expecting a different result from the same action” we remembered that classic definition of insanity. We learned the big lesson that tribe forms one person at a time, as a series of one to one relationships. This was almost too simple for us to grasp right away.

. . . → Read More: Time For Tribe: Boomers Get Connected, By Bill Kauth & Zoe Alowan

We All Need The Village, By Lizzi Rogers

Community Circle 3

We need to know that someone, somewhere, has noticed and that they CARE. Which makes US the village, and it’s a job we need to be more careful about getting right. We need to keep a look-out for one another, let ourselves care about strangers, act on behalf of those who are helpless, and encourage everyone we know to do the same.

. . . → Read More: We All Need The Village, By Lizzi Rogers

Four Things I Learned Comforting Dying People, By Dawn Q. Landau

Hospcie

If I can share some humor, or discuss news and current events, if a person needs to hear me read psalms, or have me sit quietly, then that’s what I do. Hospice care is not there to judge or give one-stop care; each patient is unique in their history, their needs and the way we care for them. I love that challenge. There are patients I’ve only known for hours, and those I will always remember — people who have touched my life, and allowed me to share a sacred time in theirs. Each week I look death in the eye and I’m reminded just how fragile life is and how my actions can help make the final transition a little bit better — I am reminded, how to live.

. . . → Read More: Four Things I Learned Comforting Dying People, By Dawn Q. Landau

Opening Our Eyes To The Nature Of This Earth, By Paul Kingsnorth

Ake Ruins 6

What does this mean? I’m not a scholar, but I can say what it means to me: it means that if you make nature your witness, and if you act as a witness for nature too, there is a truth to be found. It even means, perhaps, that the ultimate witness to who we are comes from the earth itself. When you sit with the earth, when you make it your witness and when you act as a witness for it—what do you see? What are you compelled to do? These are questions that take us beyond political stances, beyond principles, beyond arguments about engagement or detachment. They are questions, it seems to me, that can never be answered in any way other than the strictly personal. Sitting or acting; engagement or retreat; perhaps there need be no contradiction.

. . . → Read More: Opening Our Eyes To The Nature Of This Earth, By Paul Kingsnorth

Climate Change Signals The End Of The Social Sciences, By Clive Hamilton

Climate Change 5

So the advent of the Anthropocene shatters the self-contained world of social analysis that is the terrain of modern social science, and explains why those intellectuals who remain within it find it impossible to “analyze” the politics, sociology or philosophy of climate change in a way that is true to the science. They end up floundering in the old categories, unable to see that something epochal has occurred, a rupture on the scale of the Industrial Revolution or the emergence of civilization itself.

. . . → Read More: Climate Change Signals The End Of The Social Sciences, By Clive Hamilton

Species Extinction, Human Chronic Disease On The Rise, As Climate Disruption Mounts, By Dahr Jamail

Climate Change 6

A stunning new study published in the prestigious journal Science concluded that we are on the verge of causing “a major extinction event” in the oceans, and one of the scientists who authored the study stated frankly, “I honestly feel there’s not much hope for normal ecosystems in the ocean” without a dramatic shift away from the current business-as-usual fossil-fueled economy. Additionally, another recent study found that sea levels are now rising 25 percent faster than previous estimates, and the acceleration witnessed in the 1990s is even more dramatic than previously calculated. To make matters worse, another major study published in Science recently found that human activity has already pushed the planet beyond four of its nine “planetary boundaries.” The conclusion of the study said that at the rate things are progressing, the coming decades will see the earth no longer as a “safe operating space” for human beings, let alone most other species. The four boundaries we’ve already crossed are the extinction rate, deforestation, atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, and the flow of nitrogen and phosphorous (land fertilizers) into the oceans.

. . . → Read More: Species Extinction, Human Chronic Disease On The Rise, As Climate Disruption Mounts, By Dahr Jamail