What’s New

  • Order the hard copy (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Collapsing-Consciously-Transformative-Turbulent-Activism/dp/1583947124/ref=la_B002POHCPU_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1392342533&sr=1-1) which contains 17 essays and 52 reflections.
  • Order the e-book (http://www NULL.randomhouse NULL.com/book/232161/collapsing-consciously-meditations-by-carolyn-baker-phd) which contains 313 additional reflections.

Watch Carolyn and Andrew Harvey discuss Transition And Transformation: The Joy Of Preparation (http://vimeo NULL.com/33870113) on Vimeo.

Carolyn’s Latest Books

JUST RELEASED

Order now (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Navigating-Coming-Chaos-Handbook-Transition/dp/1450270875/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1295907633&sr=1-1) Read the Introduction (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Navigating_intro NULL.pdf)

Watch Navigating the Coming Chaos (part one) (http://vimeo NULL.com/21400927) on Vimeo.

Sacred Demise

(http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20)
Purchase the book (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20) Read the foreword (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/sacred_demise_foreword NULL.pdf)

Hope Dies Last: Thom Hartmann Comments On His Interviews With Guy McPherson And Michael Mann

Climate-Change-1

Think of it this way. An old and very dear friend of mine died a few months ago of cancer, and made the mistake of never believing seriously that his end was coming, and thus went out basically screaming, “No!!” It wasn’t pretty; he was so angry his wife had to have him taken out to hospice. On the other hand, my dad, who died of the same type of cancer, was ready for it, embraced it, and died at home surrounded by family. While the very end was rough, he had a pretty good last year experiencing life, family, and love while waiting for the cancer to take him down.

. . . → Read More: Hope Dies Last: Thom Hartmann Comments On His Interviews With Guy McPherson And Michael Mann

Abby Martin Of Russia TV Interviews Carolyn On Her Show “Breaking The Set”

Peak Moment TV Interviews Guy McPherson On Climate Change And Acceptance

Thom Hartmann Interviews Guy McPherson: Is Earth On The Verge Of Runaway Warming?

Mad Hominem: Why Hatred Of The Human Species Is Not Helpful, By Carolyn Baker

Finger Pointing

In some sense it is much easier to be kind to other species because they are the innocent ones. They have not left the planet in shambles. It is much more challenging to be kind to humans—the perpetrators, the plunderers we may despise but which some part of us has the capacity to become. The human species is far more connected than it is divided. I speak not in platitudes but rather in terms of the hard science of quantum physics, and I heartily recommend Paul Levy’s recent article “Quantum Physics: The Physics Of Dreaming, Part 1.” (http://www NULL.awakeninthedream NULL.com/wordpress/quantum-physics-the-physics-of-dreaming/) John Archibald Wheeler, theoretical physicist and colleague of Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr stated that, “Nothing is more important about quantum physics than this: it has destroyed the concept of the world as ‘sitting out there’.” In fact, there is no “you” and “me.” Yes, you have a body separate from mine, and you live in another place on the planet, but we are interdependently connected.

. . . → Read More: Mad Hominem: Why Hatred Of The Human Species Is Not Helpful, By Carolyn Baker

A Gift From The Collapseniks, By Craig Comstock

Collapsed Washington DC

Could we learn to regard collapse not as a firm prediction but as a scenario worth exploring? After all, the Pentagon has contingency plans for events that are arguably less likely and less devastating.

. . . → Read More: A Gift From The Collapseniks, By Craig Comstock

In Praise Of Manners, By Francis Weller

Jane

Why do grief work? So that we can register the sorrows of the planet and we do whatever we can, whatever we are obligated to do morally and spiritually, to try to prepare whatever is coming, so that they have a better chance to survive and continue. They have a right to that.

. . . → Read More: In Praise Of Manners, By Francis Weller

Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Time: Part 5: Shamans, Midwives, And Hospice Workers, By Dianne Monroe

Medicine Woman

Beyond the edge where what we know and don’t know meets lies the Unknown (with a capital U). It’s a wild place that stretches the capacity of our human consciousness. This edge space is inhabited by a very particular kind of Edge-Dweller – those willing to hold the hugeness of even our ability to know, the horizon of human consciousness.

. . . → Read More: Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Time: Part 5: Shamans, Midwives, And Hospice Workers, By Dianne Monroe

Francis Weller And Carolyn Baker Converse About Grief And Joy

Francis Photo

Grief is subversive, undermining the quiet agreement to behave and be in control of our emotions. It is an act of protest that declares our refusal to live numb and small. There is something feral about grief, something essentially outside the ordained and sanctioned behaviors of our culture. Because of that, grief is necessary to the vitality of the soul. Contrary to our fears, grief is suffused with life force.

. . . → Read More: Francis Weller And Carolyn Baker Converse About Grief And Joy

Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Times, Part 4: Low Tide, By Dianne Monroe

Edge

What we see and what we cannot yet see, what we know and cannot yet know, become the edge places from which we create new ways for humanity to live as part of our Earth community, weaving from the frayed edges of what we leave behind a bridge to the potential and possibilities of what we can become. These qualities and abilities enable us to do a dance of co-creation, visioning and building the future out of and together with what exists today.

. . . → Read More: Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Times, Part 4: Low Tide, By Dianne Monroe