Conversations with Andrew Harvey

Carolyn and Andrew Harvey on How To Respond To Catastrophic Climate Change (http://vimeo NULL.com/92105850).

Carolyn and Andrew discuss collapse (http://vimeo NULL.com/33870113).

Living Resiliently

  • Order the hard copy (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Collapsing-Consciously-Transformative-Turbulent-Activism/dp/1583947124/ref=la_B002POHCPU_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1392342533&sr=1-1) which contains 17 essays and 52 reflections.
  • Order the e-book (http://www NULL.randomhouse NULL.com/book/232161/collapsing-consciously-meditations-by-carolyn-baker-phd) which contains 313 additional reflections.

Carolyn’s Latest Books

JUST RELEASED

Order now (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Navigating-Coming-Chaos-Handbook-Transition/dp/1450270875/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1295907633&sr=1-1) Read the Introduction (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Navigating_intro NULL.pdf)

Watch Navigating the Coming Chaos (part one) (http://vimeo NULL.com/21400927) on Vimeo.

Sacred Demise

(http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20)
Purchase the book (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20) Read the foreword (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/sacred_demise_foreword NULL.pdf)

The Age Of Loneliness Is Killing Us, By George Monbiot

Man sitting on a bench under a tree

What do we call this time? It’s not the information age: the collapse of popular education movements left a void filled by marketing and conspiracy theories. Like the stone age, iron age and space age, the digital age says plenty about our artefacts but little about society. The anthropocene, in which humans exert a major impact on the biosphere, fails to distinguish this century from the previous 20. What clear social change marks out our time from those that precede it? To me it’s obvious. This is the Age of Loneliness.

. . . → Read More: The Age Of Loneliness Is Killing Us, By George Monbiot

New Pricing Options For “The Indigenous Heart: Reconnecting With The Timeless In An Era Of Endings”

Indigenous Heart

This mostly all-inclusive tour provides an opportunity to explore ancient Mayan culture—its ruins, its people, and its ancient wisdom as modernity is confronted with a series of crises and transitions. It offers a profound moment of learning from a civilization that survived centuries of adversity and eventual demise, yet still influences a vast area of Central America culturally, spiritually, and ecologically. We will combine moderately-paced sightseeing with space for rest, spiritual renewal, and connection with each other. Immersion in a magical and beautiful ecosystem in combination with delicious and lovingly-prepared gourmet food (let us know if you have special dietary needs), conversations with Mayan elders, and an exploration of ancient ruins offers sacred time and space for restoring the soul and body in deep intimacy with the Earth.

. . . → Read More: New Pricing Options For “The Indigenous Heart: Reconnecting With The Timeless In An Era Of Endings”

Staying Sane In A Suicidal Culture: Spotlight On Joanna Macy, By Dahr Jamail

Joanna

Macy believes that those who “are still on the path and not in one of the ditches” are seeing with clarity that it is “curtains for our way of life” because the prices being paid, or extorted, from the planet are too high.

. . . → Read More: Staying Sane In A Suicidal Culture: Spotlight On Joanna Macy, By Dahr Jamail

Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Time, By Dianne Monroe

First in a series about inhabiting and acting in the edge-places of our civilization as crucial for humanity’s passage through these challenging times – and inviting you to share your personal edge-dwelling experiences

. . . → Read More: Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Time, By Dianne Monroe

The Sky Is Falling: Chicken Little Was Right All Along, By Don Wilkin

Chicken

If we do manage to pull back from the abyss, or if enough of us survive the plunge, it will surely be because small groups of us have formed mutualistic communities for the express purpose of helping one another eke out a largely local living from a depleted planet Earth. We will be painfully aware, by then, that a sustainable lifestyle must involve subordinating our reproductive inclinations to the long-term well-being, not just of our own community, but of the larger ecological community on which our well-being depends.  We will certainly understand that a global ecosystem is a sacred trust that demands our respect and, yes, our reverence.  Finally, we will need the humility to understand that we need a healthy global ecosystem far more than it needs us, and that we need to invest at least as much of our treasure in husbanding that priceless natural legacy as in pursuing our own material well-being.  

. . . → Read More: The Sky Is Falling: Chicken Little Was Right All Along, By Don Wilkin

Separation, By Charles Eisenstein

MoreBeautifulWorld_Eisenstein1

This book is a guide from the old story, through the empty space between stories, and into a new story. It addresses the reader as a subject of this transition personally, and as an agent of transition—for other people, for our society, and for our planet.

. . . → Read More: Separation, By Charles Eisenstein

What Collapse Feels Like, Part 3 of 5: Resilience Begins With The Heart: All Roads Lead To Grief, By Carolyn Baker

Grief 2

We say that we want to become resilient, but we continue to shut off the heart as if resilience is something that gets engineered in the head. In fact, if resilience doesn’t begin with the heart, we can never become authentically resilient.

. . . → Read More: What Collapse Feels Like, Part 3 of 5: Resilience Begins With The Heart: All Roads Lead To Grief, By Carolyn Baker

A Circle Of Gifts, By Charles Eisenstein

Circle

Wherever I go and ask people what is missing from their lives, the most common answer (if they are not impoverished or seriously ill) is “community.” What happened to community, and why don’t we have it any more? There are many reasons – the layout of suburbia, the disappearance of public space, the automobile and the television, the high mobility of people and jobs – and, if you trace the “why’s” a few levels down, they all implicate the money system. More directly posed: community is nearly impossible in a highly monetized society like our own. That is because community is woven from gifts, which is ultimately why poor people often have stronger communities than rich people. If you are financially independent, then you really don’t depend on your neighbors – or indeed on any specific person – for anything. You can just pay someone to do it, or pay someone else to do it.

. . . → Read More: A Circle Of Gifts, By Charles Eisenstein

Can We Really Walk Away From Empire? By Carolyn Baker

Universe

For me there are three enormous obstacles to exiting empire, all of which are related to the internal dynamics of empire programming, and they are so profound that, on one level, radically altering one’s living arrangements may be the least daunting facet of making the break.

. . . → Read More: Can We Really Walk Away From Empire? By Carolyn Baker

Community Grounded In Grief In The Age Of Limits, By Carolyn Baker With Introduction By Orren Whiddon

Group Candles

With The Age of Limits (http://www NULL.ageoflimits NULL.org/) our purpose was twofold, to speak the words… Decline, Collapse, and Die Off. Words that are truly devastating in their scope—and to create a conversational format based on face to face human interaction, without the deceptive anonymity of pixels on a screen. In these ways The Age of Limits was a great first year success as attendees stepped into the conversational space to share their own experiences and understanding of the emergent collapse, stepping outside of the emotional refuge of quantitative analysis, blog posts and comment streams to engage one another on a human and personal level. As this engagement progressed, as our temporary weekend community matured, people began to take risks and reveal their private emotional processing of collapse…and their own part in it. And this process of risk taking, of emotional self revelation, became itself one of the powerful currents of the event; a point well illustrated by our video (http://www NULL.youtube NULL.com/watch?v=WBFijbhLuCA) of attendee interactions, and an outcome that was not anticipated by myself as the organizer. Lesson learned.

. . . → Read More: Community Grounded In Grief In The Age Of Limits, By Carolyn Baker With Introduction By Orren Whiddon