Conversations with Andrew Harvey

Carolyn and Andrew Harvey on How To Respond To Catastrophic Climate Change (http://vimeo NULL.com/92105850).

Carolyn and Andrew discuss collapse (http://vimeo NULL.com/33870113).

Living Resiliently

  • Order the hard copy (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Collapsing-Consciously-Transformative-Turbulent-Activism/dp/1583947124/ref=la_B002POHCPU_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1392342533&sr=1-1) which contains 17 essays and 52 reflections.
  • Order the e-book (http://www NULL.randomhouse NULL.com/book/232161/collapsing-consciously-meditations-by-carolyn-baker-phd) which contains 313 additional reflections.

Carolyn’s Latest Books

JUST RELEASED

Order now (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Navigating-Coming-Chaos-Handbook-Transition/dp/1450270875/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1295907633&sr=1-1) Read the Introduction (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Navigating_intro NULL.pdf)

Watch Navigating the Coming Chaos (part one) (http://vimeo NULL.com/21400927) on Vimeo.

Sacred Demise

(http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20)
Purchase the book (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20) Read the foreword (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/sacred_demise_foreword NULL.pdf)

Time For Tribe: Boomers Get Connected, By Bill Kauth & Zoe Alowan

Communities Magazine

Learning how to engage people in our “New Tribe” model took us seven years of devotion and focus. There were some dramatic fails, like repeatedly calling a group of people together saying “Lets build community!” They were always wildly enthusiastic, but for some reason that was the last time that group ever met. After too often “expecting a different result from the same action” we remembered that classic definition of insanity. We learned the big lesson that tribe forms one person at a time, as a series of one to one relationships. This was almost too simple for us to grasp right away.

. . . → Read More: Time For Tribe: Boomers Get Connected, By Bill Kauth & Zoe Alowan

The Gifts Of Grief In A Time Of Endings, A Workshop With Carolyn Baker

ap382838914497

“The deeper the sorrow, the greater the joy,” wrote William Blake. In fact, grief is a doorway—a corridor to unknown, disowned, or dormant parts of the psyche that may incite, even inflame our creativity and most precious human gifts. And finally, grief and love are interdependent. When one is enhanced, the other is enlivened.

. . . → Read More: The Gifts Of Grief In A Time Of Endings, A Workshop With Carolyn Baker

We All Need The Village, By Lizzi Rogers

Community Circle 3

We need to know that someone, somewhere, has noticed and that they CARE. Which makes US the village, and it’s a job we need to be more careful about getting right. We need to keep a look-out for one another, let ourselves care about strangers, act on behalf of those who are helpless, and encourage everyone we know to do the same.

. . . → Read More: We All Need The Village, By Lizzi Rogers

The Age Of Loneliness Is Killing Us, By George Monbiot

Man sitting on a bench under a tree

What do we call this time? It’s not the information age: the collapse of popular education movements left a void filled by marketing and conspiracy theories. Like the stone age, iron age and space age, the digital age says plenty about our artefacts but little about society. The anthropocene, in which humans exert a major impact on the biosphere, fails to distinguish this century from the previous 20. What clear social change marks out our time from those that precede it? To me it’s obvious. This is the Age of Loneliness.

. . . → Read More: The Age Of Loneliness Is Killing Us, By George Monbiot

Staying Sane In A Suicidal Culture: Spotlight On Joanna Macy, By Dahr Jamail

Joanna

Macy believes that those who “are still on the path and not in one of the ditches” are seeing with clarity that it is “curtains for our way of life” because the prices being paid, or extorted, from the planet are too high.

. . . → Read More: Staying Sane In A Suicidal Culture: Spotlight On Joanna Macy, By Dahr Jamail

Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Time, By Dianne Monroe

First in a series about inhabiting and acting in the edge-places of our civilization as crucial for humanity’s passage through these challenging times – and inviting you to share your personal edge-dwelling experiences

. . . → Read More: Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Time, By Dianne Monroe

The Sky Is Falling: Chicken Little Was Right All Along, By Don Wilkin

Chicken

If we do manage to pull back from the abyss, or if enough of us survive the plunge, it will surely be because small groups of us have formed mutualistic communities for the express purpose of helping one another eke out a largely local living from a depleted planet Earth. We will be painfully aware, by then, that a sustainable lifestyle must involve subordinating our reproductive inclinations to the long-term well-being, not just of our own community, but of the larger ecological community on which our well-being depends.  We will certainly understand that a global ecosystem is a sacred trust that demands our respect and, yes, our reverence.  Finally, we will need the humility to understand that we need a healthy global ecosystem far more than it needs us, and that we need to invest at least as much of our treasure in husbanding that priceless natural legacy as in pursuing our own material well-being.  

. . . → Read More: The Sky Is Falling: Chicken Little Was Right All Along, By Don Wilkin

Separation, By Charles Eisenstein

MoreBeautifulWorld_Eisenstein1

This book is a guide from the old story, through the empty space between stories, and into a new story. It addresses the reader as a subject of this transition personally, and as an agent of transition—for other people, for our society, and for our planet.

. . . → Read More: Separation, By Charles Eisenstein

What Collapse Feels Like, Part 3 of 5: Resilience Begins With The Heart: All Roads Lead To Grief, By Carolyn Baker

Grief 2

We say that we want to become resilient, but we continue to shut off the heart as if resilience is something that gets engineered in the head. In fact, if resilience doesn’t begin with the heart, we can never become authentically resilient.

. . . → Read More: What Collapse Feels Like, Part 3 of 5: Resilience Begins With The Heart: All Roads Lead To Grief, By Carolyn Baker

A Circle Of Gifts, By Charles Eisenstein

Circle

Wherever I go and ask people what is missing from their lives, the most common answer (if they are not impoverished or seriously ill) is “community.” What happened to community, and why don’t we have it any more? There are many reasons – the layout of suburbia, the disappearance of public space, the automobile and the television, the high mobility of people and jobs – and, if you trace the “why’s” a few levels down, they all implicate the money system. More directly posed: community is nearly impossible in a highly monetized society like our own. That is because community is woven from gifts, which is ultimately why poor people often have stronger communities than rich people. If you are financially independent, then you really don’t depend on your neighbors – or indeed on any specific person – for anything. You can just pay someone to do it, or pay someone else to do it.

. . . → Read More: A Circle Of Gifts, By Charles Eisenstein