Conversations with Andrew Harvey

Carolyn and Andrew Harvey on How To Respond To Catastrophic Climate Change (http://vimeo NULL.com/92105850).

Carolyn and Andrew discuss collapse (http://vimeo NULL.com/33870113).

Living Resiliently

  • Order the hard copy (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Collapsing-Consciously-Transformative-Turbulent-Activism/dp/1583947124/ref=la_B002POHCPU_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1392342533&sr=1-1) which contains 17 essays and 52 reflections.
  • Order the e-book (http://www NULL.randomhouse NULL.com/book/232161/collapsing-consciously-meditations-by-carolyn-baker-phd) which contains 313 additional reflections.

Carolyn’s Latest Books

JUST RELEASED

Order now (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Navigating-Coming-Chaos-Handbook-Transition/dp/1450270875/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1295907633&sr=1-1) Read the Introduction (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Navigating_intro NULL.pdf)

Watch Navigating the Coming Chaos (part one) (http://vimeo NULL.com/21400927) on Vimeo.

Sacred Demise

(http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20)
Purchase the book (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20) Read the foreword (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/sacred_demise_foreword NULL.pdf)

Join Me Sunday Night, November 23, On The Lifeboat Hour With Mimi German

Mimi

My guest this coming Sunday night is Mimi German, no stranger to the Lifeboat Hour. We will discuss the impact of her recent work with Brittany Maynard before Brittany chose to die with dignity, and we’ll talk about what dying with dignity means for all of us.

. . . → Read More: Join Me Sunday Night, November 23, On The Lifeboat Hour With Mimi German

Foreword To “Extinction Dialogues,” By Andrew Harvey

Andrew

No one who truly reads this book will ever be the same afterwards. Whether you agree in the end with its drastic and shocking conclusions is, of course, up to you; the very fact that such a book, outlining the case for the coming extinction of life on earth, could be written at all – . . . → Read More: Foreword To “Extinction Dialogues,” By Andrew Harvey

“Peak Water,” Methane Blow Holes, And Ice-Free Arctic Cruises: The Climate Crisis Deepens, By Dahr Jamail

Dahr J

As has been mentioned in these dispatches previously, the planet is now in the early stages of its sixth mass extinction event, and humans are indeed responsible, according to yet another published study, this one in Science. According to the study, large vertebrate animals (megafauna), which include elephants and polar bears, face the steepest decline since they require large habitats and are targeted by human hunters. The loss of megafauna places ecosystems off balance and leads to consequences like massive rodent infestations that proceed to impact the well-being and stability of a large segment of species, including humans. The study highlights how the particularly steep decline of megafauna we are seeing now is characteristic of all the previous mass extinction events.

. . . → Read More: “Peak Water,” Methane Blow Holes, And Ice-Free Arctic Cruises: The Climate Crisis Deepens, By Dahr Jamail

Ensouled On The Planet, By Marion Woodman, An Interview By Nancy Ryley

Marion

Yet, despite all the horrors we have created, we are still doing precisely what we know will be ultimately destructive. Denial! Denial! We are still accepting a cultural value that annihilates the Earth. If we don’t change, we are going to our own extinction. This is precisely what addicts do. Addicts—in other words most of our society—pretend there’s nothing wrong. As they laugh and talk and plan, they deny their dying souls. That’s what we’re doing to the planet. We fight about things that won’t matter if we are extinct.

. . . → Read More: Ensouled On The Planet, By Marion Woodman, An Interview By Nancy Ryley

Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Times, Part 4: Low Tide, By Dianne Monroe

Edge

What we see and what we cannot yet see, what we know and cannot yet know, become the edge places from which we create new ways for humanity to live as part of our Earth community, weaving from the frayed edges of what we leave behind a bridge to the potential and possibilities of what we can become. These qualities and abilities enable us to do a dance of co-creation, visioning and building the future out of and together with what exists today.

. . . → Read More: Edge-Dwelling: A Social Ecology For Our Times, Part 4: Low Tide, By Dianne Monroe

Preparing For Near-Term Extinction, By Carolyn Baker

Extinction 2

When I began writing this article, a friend of mine had recently entered hospice. While I was finishing the article, my friend died. She was not in the same town as I, but during the past month, we had been able to speak by phone several times a week. Given my friend’s decline and death and its impact on me, I was not taken aback by Daniel Drumright’s essay “The Irreconcilable Acceptance Of Near-Term Extinction,” posted last week on Guy McPherson’s Nature Bats Last (http://guymcpherson NULL.com/2013/04/the-irreconcilable-acceptance-of-near-term-extinction/) blog.

. . . → Read More: Preparing For Near-Term Extinction, By Carolyn Baker

The Sixth Great Extinction: Beyond Transition, The Long Emergency, And The Great Turning, By Carolyn Baker

Earth On Fire

Climate change is real, and it is human-caused. We engender climate change in different ways—overpopulation, using fossil fuels, and above all, by consuming. Before the advent of industrial civilization, humans used to consume, for the most part, what they actually needed. Today, consuming has become an addiction. In answer to McPherson’s question, “What underlies our drive to consume?” I would answer: the profound emptiness that inhabits the psyches of human beings in the modern, industrial world. Yes, many aspects of the industrial living arrangement force us to consume, but whenever those aspects are threatened by any talk of creating different living arrangements because those arrangements are creating climate change, both the politician and the ordinary citizen begin recoiling in terror. In other words, we consume voraciously because we cannot imagine another, more satisfying way of life, and we know that if we do not maintain our consumption-saturated lifestyles, we will be forced to confront our sense of emptiness and lack of meaning. . . . → Read More: The Sixth Great Extinction: Beyond Transition, The Long Emergency, And The Great Turning, By Carolyn Baker

Three Paths To Near-Term Human Extinction, By Guy McPherson

Human Extinction

About a decade ago I realized we were putting the finishing touches on our own extinction party, with the party probably over by 2030. During the intervening period I’ve seen nothing to sway this belief, and much evidence to reinforce it. Yet the protests, ridicule, and hate mail reach a fervent pitch when I speak or write about the potential for near-term extinction of Homo sapiens. “We’re different.” “We’re special.” “We’re too intelligent.” “We’ll find a way out. We always do.” . . . → Read More: Three Paths To Near-Term Human Extinction, By Guy McPherson

Is There An Ecological Unconscious? By Daniel B. Smith

Labyrinth 2

[Think the collapse of industrial civilization is nothing more than a physical phenomenon requiring only logistical preparation? This brilliant New York Times article from earlier this year argues otherwise. It is even more relevant than it was 11 months ago.–CB]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE (http://www NULL.nytimes NULL.com/2010/01/31/magazine/31ecopsych-t NULL.html)

About eight years ago, Glenn Albrecht began . . . → Read More: Is There An Ecological Unconscious? By Daniel B. Smith