What’s New

To be released November 19, featured in Andrew Harvey's Sacred Activism Series, North Atlantic Books, pre-order here.

Watch Carolyn and Andrew Harvey discuss Transition And Transformation: The Joy Of Preparation (http://vimeo NULL.com/33870113) on Vimeo.

Carolyn’s Latest Books

JUST RELEASED

Order now (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Navigating-Coming-Chaos-Handbook-Transition/dp/1450270875/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1295907633&sr=1-1) Read the Introduction (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Navigating_intro NULL.pdf)

Watch Navigating the Coming Chaos (part one) (http://vimeo NULL.com/21400927) on Vimeo.

Sacred Demise

(http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20)
Purchase the book (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Sacred-Demise-Spiritual-Industrial-Civilizations/dp/1440119724/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?tag=533633855-20) Read the foreword (http://carolynbaker NULL.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/sacred_demise_foreword NULL.pdf)

Dmitry Orlov Reviews “Collapsing Consciously”

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Carolyn Baker’s CollapsingConsciously: Transformative Truths for Turbulent Times (http://www NULL.amazon NULL.com/Collapsing-Consciously-Meditations-Reflections-Turbulent-ebook/dp/B00D0O7AW4) is perhaps the most approachable book on collapse you are likely to find. Compared to Jarred Diamond’s Collapse, which weighs in at just over 600 pages, Baker’s is well under 200. And yet in these few pages Baker manages to tackle a topic which Diamond studiously avoids: Whatever shall we do about the fact that collapse is happening all around us right now?

. . . → Read More: Dmitry Orlov Reviews “Collapsing Consciously”

Before It’s News Interview Regarding “Collapsing Consciously”

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Before It’s News Interviews me regarding Collapsing Consciously: Transformative Truths For Turbulent Times

. . . → Read More: Before It’s News Interview Regarding “Collapsing Consciously”

What Collapse Feels Like, Part 3 of 5: Resilience Begins With The Heart: All Roads Lead To Grief, By Carolyn Baker

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We say that we want to become resilient, but we continue to shut off the heart as if resilience is something that gets engineered in the head. In fact, if resilience doesn’t begin with the heart, we can never become authentically resilient.

. . . → Read More: What Collapse Feels Like, Part 3 of 5: Resilience Begins With The Heart: All Roads Lead To Grief, By Carolyn Baker

What An Animal You Are! By Carolyn Baker

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Animals can be superb teachers for humans preparing for the future. Carefully observing their capacity for being present in their bodies and therefore living in the moment is critical. Studying an animal’s instinct for survival and self-protection can enhance our own resilience. What is more, I have experienced that animals are extraordinary teachers, not only in life, but in death as well. Every animal with whom I have had to part has profoundly opened my heart and impacted me in ways I could not have imagined. Allow yourself to give your heart to an animal companion, and when you must part with it, allow yourself to grieve your loss thoroughly. You may be surprised at the parts of yourself that will be revealed. . . . → Read More: What An Animal You Are! By Carolyn Baker

Mutually Assured Well Being: The Continuity Of Community And Individual Resilience, By Carolyn Baker

Interdependence

I invite the reader to review the features of community resilience and personal resilience several times. In doing so, I believe it is impossible to miss their inextricable connection and how the two types of resilience impact the other given the reality that individuals and communities foster both. . . . → Read More: Mutually Assured Well Being: The Continuity Of Community And Individual Resilience, By Carolyn Baker

Resilience: Why So Many Parents Today Are Getting It Wrong, By Annie Lussenburg

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You see, resilience comes out of a struggle. That’s it, there’s no other way to get it. Take the wrong bus and end up at the wrong stop will build you resilience but only if you aren’t able to place a rescue call for someone to pick you up. Failing math and having to try harder: There’s a good one. Having to go to another soccer game and try again because the last time you mucked up and everyone is mad at you. Realizing that a course or activity you thought you’d enjoy is just terrible but sticking with it anyway, even though you’re sometimes miserable. . . . → Read More: Resilience: Why So Many Parents Today Are Getting It Wrong, By Annie Lussenburg

Building Resilience In Climate Change, By Richard Heinberg

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Once we start down the path of building resilience, the positive effects become synergetic. For example, by reprocessing recycled materials locally rather than sending them to far-off countries for reprocessing, and by composting local food waste and sewage, communities can conserve energy while creating jobs, building topsoil, and reducing dependence on increasingly unreliable distant sources of food and materials. Again: resilience helps us adapt to inevitable shocks and changes, while also aiding proactive efforts to reduce energy consumption and thus avert future global warming. Building resilience helps us address a range of problems with just a few basic strategies. . . . → Read More: Building Resilience In Climate Change, By Richard Heinberg

Our Cooperative Darwinian Moment, By Richard Heinberg

Connection With Each Other

Evolution can be ruthless at eliminating the unfit. “Red in tooth and claw,” as Tennyson memorably described it, Nature routinely sacrifices billions of individual organisms and sometimes entire species in the course of its adaptive progression. We humans have been able to blunt Nature’s fangs. We take care of individuals who would not be able to survive on their own—the elderly, the sick, the wounded—and we’ve been doing so for a long time, perhaps tens of thousands of years. In recent decades more and more of us have leapt aboard the raft of societally ensured survival—though in ways that often have little to do with compassion: today even most hale and hearty individuals would be hard pressed to stay alive for more than a few days or weeks if cut adrift from supermarkets, ATMs, and the rest of the infrastructure of modern industrialism. . . . → Read More: Our Cooperative Darwinian Moment, By Richard Heinberg

What’s The Big Deal About “Resilience”?, By Torie Bosch

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One of the really important things about resilience thinking is that it links together so many domains that we typically only looked at singly. Our thinking over the last 200 years has become very siloed, in part due to university structures, university careers, but also due to reasons beyond that. I think one of the really interesting things is that resilience crosses a lot of those boundaries between disciplines, because the general concept has applications in business and in the environment, but also in social communities. A really interesting part of resilience thinking is that you bring communities closer together so they have more options and can be more creative in responding to stress. . . . → Read More: What’s The Big Deal About “Resilience”?, By Torie Bosch

8 Expressions of Simplicity For Healthy Living, By Duane Elgin

Simplicity

To portray the richness of simplicity as a theme for healthy living, here are eight different flowerings that I see growing consciously in the “garden of simplicity.” Although there is overlap among them, each expression of simplicity seems sufficiently distinct to warrant a separate category. These are presented in no particular order, as all are important. . . . → Read More: 8 Expressions of Simplicity For Healthy Living, By Duane Elgin